Beating New Year’s Depression

January 4, 2019

The media often portray New Year as one of the happiest, most exciting time of the year, but not everyone will see it this way. This is especially true for those who suffer with depression or those who are more predisposed to getting depressed during this season.

New Year’s Eve or the New Year itself can bring more feelings of sadness and/or loneliness to these people. According to psychologists, this could be due to the reflective nature of this holiday.

During this time of the year, people usually look back on the past year and observe what they have accomplished, and what they wanted to do more of and/or change on the coming year.

When you feel you didn’t accomplish enough or when you’re more prone to rumination, this holiday can easily lead you to a spiral of negativity. However, there are ways to prevent you from getting into that.

  1. Plan something that gets you really excited

Whether it’s taking a trip or trying a new hobby, planning and anticipating for something can give you a boost of happiness. The effect is still the same even if you’re planning to make it happen on the later part of the year.

  1. Examine your expectations

If you decide to come up with New Year’s resolutions, examine your expectations and decide if they are realistic. If they don’t seem to be, then try breaking them down to smaller goals.

  1. Reach out

Know that it’s okay to feel this way during this holiday. If you feel isolated or extremely sad, don’t hesitate to reach out to your family, friends, a community, or a professional.


If you still feel depressed after seeking professional help, we can help.

 

References:

https://broadly.vice.com/amp/en_us/article/d343ex/why-is-new-years-eve-so-depressing

https://www.webmd.com/depression/features/new-year-blues

https://www.themuse.com/advice/new-years-blu